Nov 17, 2016

First International Prize in Statistics

IMS Fellow Sir David Cox has been named the inaugural recipient of the International Prize in Statistics. The Prize, considered the highest honor in statistics, will be bestowed every other year to an individual or team for major achievements using statistics to advance science, technology and human welfare.

Sir David Cox

Sir David Cox

Cox is a giant in the field of statistics, but the International Prize in Statistics Foundation is recognizing him specifically for his 1972 paper in which he developed the proportional hazards model that today bears his name. The Cox Model is widely used in the analysis of survival data and enables researchers to more easily identify the risks of specific factors for mortality or other survival outcomes among groups of patients with disparate characteristics. From disease risk assessment and treatment evaluation to product liability, school dropout, re-incarceration and AIDS surveillance systems, the Cox Model has been applied widely in science and engineering.

“Professor Cox changed how we analyze and understand the effect of natural or human-induced risk factors on survival outcomes, paving the way for powerful scientific inquiry and discoveries that have impacted human health worldwide,” said Susan Ellenberg, chair of the International Prize in Statistics Foundation. “Use of the Cox Model in the physical, medical, life, earth, social and other sciences, as well as engineering fields, has yielded more robust and detailed information that has helped researchers and policymakers address some of society’s most pressing challenges.”

Successful application of the Cox Model has led to breakthroughs with far-reaching societal effects, including the areas of smoking cessation, particulate air pollution mortality, risk factors of coronary artery disease and analyzing treatments for lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, obesity, sleep apnea and septic shock.

In 2010, Cox received the Copley Medal, the Royal Society’s highest award. Knighted in 1985, Cox is a Fellow of the Royal Society, an honorary fellow of the British Academy and a foreign associate of the US National Academy of Sciences. He has served as president of the Bernoulli Society, Royal Statistical Society and International Statistical Institute.

Cox’s 50-year career included technical and research positions in the private and nonprofit sectors, as well as numerous academic appointments as professor or department chair at Birkbeck College, Imperial College London, Nuffield College and Oxford University. He earned his PhD from the University of Leeds in 1949. Though he retired in 1994, Cox remains active in the profession in Oxford, UK.

Together with a monetary award of $75,000, the International Prize in Statistics will be presented to Sir David Cox at the World Statistics Congress in Marrakech, Morocco, next July.

Share

Leave a comment

*

Share

Welcome!

Welcome to the IMS Bulletin website! We are developing the way we communicate news and information more effectively with members. The print Bulletin is still with us (free with IMS membership), and still available as a PDF to download, but in addition, we are placing some of the news, columns and articles on this blog site, which will allow you the opportunity to interact more. We are always keen to hear from IMS members, and encourage you to write articles and reports that other IMS members would find interesting. Contact the IMS Bulletin at bulletin@imstat.org

What is “Open Forum”?

In the Open Forum, any IMS member can propose a topic for discussion. Email your subject and an opening paragraph (to bulletin@imstat.org) and we'll post it to start off the discussion. Other readers can join in the debate by commenting on the post. Search other Open Forum posts by using the Open Forum category link below. Start a discussion today!

About IMS

The Institute of Mathematical Statistics is an international scholarly society devoted to the development and dissemination of the theory and applications of statistics and probability. We have about 4,500 members around the world. Visit IMS at http://imstat.org
Latest Issue